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American Aquarium with Cory Branan

June 7, 2018 19:00 to 23:59

Thursday, June 7th, 2017


American Aquarium

For nearly a decade, American Aquarium have spent the majority of their days on the road, burning through a sprawl of highways during the day and playing hours of raw, rootsy rock & roll at night. Sometimes, the job is a grind. Most times, it's a blessing. American Aquarium's songs, filled with biographical lyrics about last calls, lost love and long horizons, have always explored both sides of that divide. For every drunken night at the bar, there's a hangover in the morning. For every new relationship, there's the chance of a broken heart. It's that kind of honesty — that sort of balance — that makes the band's newest album, Wolves, their strongest release to date.

And it nearly didn't happen. When American Aquarium traveled to Muscle Shoals to record Burn.Flicker.Die. in 2012, they were convinced the album would be their last. Even though they had enlisted the help of award-winning singer-songwriter Jason Isbell to produce the sessions, they were exhausted; weathered and whittled to the bone by more than a half-decade of heavy partying and heavier touring. To a small group of diehard fans, they were absolute rockstars… but being rockstars to a cult audience doesn't always put food on your table or gas in your tank. BJ Barham, the band's frontman, was so poor that he'd been living out of a storage unit for months, unable to afford an apartment in the band's hometown of Raleigh, North Carolina.

Clearly, something had to give. Maybe it was time to make one final album — an album about failure, desperation and disillusionment — and then throw in the towel.

As fate would have it, Burn.Flicker.Die. eventually proved itself to be the band’s most successful release to date. Critics loved it. Fans rallied behind it. Fast forward 2 years and almost 500 shows later, the band has travelled the world, quadrupled their fan base and reinvented their passion for the road. When the time came to record another album in June 2014, it only made sense to do something that celebrated survival rather than failure.

The result? Wolves, which Barham describes as "the sound of a band firing on all cylinders". Produced by Megafaun's Brad Cook and recorded during a 20-day stay at Echo Mountain Studios in Asheville, NC, Wolves was funded entirely by American Aquarium’s diehard fanbase. The album’s 10 tracks represent a departure from the band’s signature twang. Instead drawing more from the alternative rock sound that inspired their name almost a decade ago. Wolves blends the twang of the pedal steel with the dark, dirty swirl of two electric guitars, creating a sound that's fit for the roadhouse, the honky tonk and the dive bar. Barham has certainly spent time in all three, but now looks to brighter horizons in these new songs.

"I've always written about being the drunk guy at the bar at 2 a.m.," he admits. "I've written about the pick-up lines and the drinking and the drugs. This record is more personal than that. It's a coming of age record."

It's also a record that reaffirms his faith in American Aquarium, a band he started in 2006. Since that time, more than 25 musicians have passed through the group's ranks. In recent years though, things have felt a lot more stable. Ryan Johnson, Bill Corbin, Whit Wright, Kevin McClain and the newest addition, Colin Dimeo, round out the group, turning Barham's songs into fiery, fleshed-out compositions.

With Wolves, which hit stores in early 2015, American Aquarium is literally bigger and better.

"We were legitimized by Burn.Flicker.Die.," Barham says. "That album was a breakup record with the road. It basically said, 'This is our last album, this is why we're quitting, and hey, thanks for the memories.' Fast-forward, though, and we've got a new record that says, 'We ain't done yet.'"


Cory Branan

ADIOS is Cory Branan's death record. Not the cheeriest of openings, but like all of Branan's mercurial work it's probably not what you think. As funny and defiant as it is touching and sad, this self-dubbed "loser's survival kit" doesn't spare its subjects or the listener.

Not even Branan's deceased father is let off the hook. In the tender homage "The Vow" he drolly cites his father's favorite banality "that's what you get for thinking" as "probably not the best lesson for kids." For most songwriters that would be the punchline but Branan pushes through words and, in his father's actions, finds a kind of "genius in the effortless way he just 'did'."

Not all the death on ADIOS is literal mortality. "Imogene" is sung from the wreckage of a love that once "poked fun at the pain, stoked the sun in the rain" but ends with the urgent call to "act on the embers, ash won't remember the way back to fire."

The trademark lyrical agility is mirrored sonically. Never a genre loyalist, ADIOS finds Branan (much like his musically restless heroes Elvis Costello and Tom Waits) coloring outside the lines in sometimes clashing shades of fuzz and twang. While unafraid to play it arrow-straight when called for (“the Vow”, “Equinox”, “Don't Go”), ADIOS veers wildly from the Buddy Holly-esque rave up "I Only Know" (sung with punk notables Laura Jane Grace and Dave Hause), through the swampy "Walls, MS" to the Costello-like new wave of "Visiting Hours." The blistering punk of "Another Nightmare in America" bops along daring listeners to "Look away, look away, move along, nothing to see here" (the song is from the point of view of a racist killer cop). And as the mourning singer on "Cold Blue Moonlight" shifts from paralysis to panic, the song's jazzy drone shifts to an almost Sabbath fury. The tonal shifts are always deliberate and not just simple genre hopping; while the turns can be jarring you can trust Branan to take you somewhere unexpected.

The 14-song album was self-produced and recorded in the spring of 2016 at Tweed Studios in Oxford, MS with a tight three piece: Branan on lead vocals and guitar (both electric and acoustic); Robbie Crowell of Deer Tick on drums and percussion, keys, and horns; and James “Haggs” Haggerty on bass. Additionally, Amanda Shires contributes on fiddle and vocals, and Laura Jane Grace of Against Me! and Dave Hause provide guest vocals.

Cory Branan has four previous full-length releases: The Hell You Say (2002, Madjack Records), 12 Songs (2006, Madjack), Mutt (2012, Bloodshot Records), and The No-Hit Wonder (2014, Bloodshot). His music has received critical praise from the likes of Rolling Stone, NPR All Things Considered, Noisey, Wall Street Journal, Paste Magazine, Oxford American, Consequence of Sound, Southern Living, and many others.

Wednesday 3/21
Accidental Comedy Presents: Modern Kicks Comedy
thru Wed Mar 28

Thursday 3/22
Soup for the Soul

Friday 3/23
Wine ONLY Tasting with Simi Winery & Estancia Vineyards

Saturday 3/24
Adult Swim: Whiskey/Bourbon Tasting

Sunday 3/25
Weird Al Yankovic

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